General information


Subject type: Mandatory

Coordinator: Rafael Suarez Gómez

Trimester: Second term

Credits: 4

Teaching staff: 

Jordi Roquer González

Skills


Specific skills
  • E9_Apply the mechanical, electronic and digital principles of sound capture, amplification and recording for application to different platforms: shows, radio, television, audiovisual and multimedia. Postproduce the audio and add the sound effects of an audiovisual production

  • E11_Apply musical rules and languages ​​for music creation and sound recording in music production and the creation of electronic music for use as soundtracks in audiovisual productions

  • E13_Apply the principles of visual and sound design for the creation of presentation elements used in sound, audiovisual, television and show products

Transversal competences
  • T2_That students have the ability to work as members of an interdisciplinary team either as one more member, or performing management tasks in order to contribute to developing projects with pragmatism and a sense of responsibility, making commitments taking into account the available resources

Description


The subject includes the theoretical and practical skills seen in Audio and Sound, Music Creation and Sound Production to consolidate them in the field of music production. We work in both the field of analysis and praxis.

This subject has methodological and digital resources to make possible its continuity in non-contact mode in the event that it is necessary for reasons related to COVID-19. In this way, the achievement of the same knowledge and skills that are specified in this teaching plan will be ensured. 

Learning outcomes


At the end of the course the student must be able to:

1. Use sound recording techniques in a wide range of situations.
2. Use the equalization and compression parameters.
3. Make your own personal study based on DAW and / or Virtual study.
4. Create your own sounds and sound textures for both music and special effects.
5. Create structured and homologable themes of electronic music in any type of style and for any possible recipient of the audiovisual sector.
6. Understand the concepts of rhythm, harmony and melody.
7. Know computer music notation systems.
8. Create a topic with a proper structure.
9. Know the different parts of a musical arrangement.
10. Know the different musical styles and their characteristics.
11. Know how to plan a musical recording.
12. Use sound recording techniques in a wide range of situations.
13. Creatively look for the sound elements needed for your goal and apply creativity.

In addition, the student will also achieve the following learning outcomes:

14. To know the different stages of a musical production and its tools and methodologies.
15. Identify the main aesthetic and stylistic currents of music in audiovisuals.
16. To have tools and analytical resources for an in-depth analysis of sound discourses in musical production, both historical and current.
17. To be able to analyze the role of sound in the audiovisual media beyond strictly technical issues.
 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

Working methodology


The course combines theoretical sessions (collective discussion sessions on support materials such as documentaries and articles) with practical sessions. The work methodology is divided into two distinct parts:

- Large group sessions (3h / week) where theoretical knowledge is taught. 

- Practical sessions in small groups (2h fortnightly), where activities focused on the creation, editing and mixing of music are developed.

Attendance at internships is mandatory.

This course, due to the situation generated by COVID-19, some of the large group sessions will be held in hybrid format: face-to-face and online (via streaming). This will allow students to rotate to face-to-face classes, respecting the maximum number of students per classroom imposed by the distance measures. When they do not have a face-to-face session, they will be able to follow the class online from home.
With regard to internship sessions in smaller spaces (such as laboratories, studios or sets), where appropriate, work will be carried out simultaneously in several spaces in order to ensure that the conditions established by the safety protocols are met.
at
 

Contents


THEORY

 

BLOCK 1 - History of music production: genres, styles and schools of production

1. The notions of 'musical production' and the various concepts associated with the term 'producer'.

2. A brief tour of the history of music production. 

3. The conflict of labels, genres and musical styles.

4. Production styles and schools.

5 Relationships between technical procedure and sound aesthetics.

 

BLOCK 2 - Creative tools and resources. Production analysis.

1. Audio production tools. Corrective vs. creative skills.

2. Auditory recognition of the effects and creative processes studied.

3. The musicological perspective of music production.

4. Analysis of productions in the field of recording, film and advertising.

 

WORK EXPERIENCE

 

PRACTICE 1 - STRUCTURE AND FORM 

Review of DAW tools: Reason and Protools.

Assembly of a theme with default shape and structure. Work with library materials and samplers.

2 teaching hours. Individual practice not evaluable.

 

PRACTICE 2 - CAPTURE AND SAMPLING (practice linked to PS19-20) 

Exterior recording of elements to generate a sample bank to be used for the project.

Use of specific microphone (including shotgun and hanger).

2 teaching hours + 4 hours of independent work. Activity linked to the final work (therefore in group). 

 

PRACTICE 3 - RHYTHMIC BASE

Generation of a sampling patch with NNXT in Reason with practice samples 2. 

Creation of a rhythmic base with the generated samples. Optional sequencing / recording using virtual and / or acoustic instruments. 

2 teaching hours + 4-10 hours of independent work. Activity linked to the final work (therefore in group).

 

PRACTICE 4 - EDITING AND MIXING 

Final editing, cleaning, mixing and mastering of the project.

2 teaching hours + 4-10 hours of independent work. Activity linked to the final work (therefore in group).

 

Practices 2 and 3 may be required to weigh the final grade of the course.

Practice 2 is done by recovering the part of capture that could not be done in Sound Production (course 19-20) due to the COVID-19.

To do practices 2 and 3 it is essential to have formalized the working group for the final project (this must be communicated to the teacher).

It is necessary to agree on the use of the studies with the teacher of the subject and to manage the reservation (Sermat) in advance.

 

 

Learning activities


Activity 1. Creation of a musical structure

Composition of a musical structure based on the resources of a DAW.

Learning outcomes: At the end of the activity the student should be able to:
LO2 Use equalization and compression parameters.
LO4 Create their own sounds and sound textures for both music and special effects.
LO5 Create structured and homologable themes of electronic music in any type of style and for any possible recipient of the audiovisual sector.
LO6 Understand the concepts of rhythm, harmony and melody.
LO7 Know computer music notation systems.
LO8 Create a topic with a suitable structure.

 

Activity 2. Capture and sampling.

Exterior recording of elements to generate a sample bank to be used for the project.

Use of specific microphone (including shotgun and hanger).

Learning outcomes: At the end of the activity the student should be able to:
LO2 Use equalization and compression parameters.
LO4 Create their own sounds and sound textures for both music and special effects.
LO6 Understand the concepts of rhythm, harmony and melody. 

LO7 Know computer music notation systems.

LO14 Understand the different stages of a musical production and its tools and methodologies
 

Activity 3. Production on a rhythmic basis

Generation of a sampling patch with NNXT in Reason with practice samples 2. 

Creation of a rhythmic base with the generated samples. Optional sequencing / recording using virtual and / or acoustic instruments.

Learning outcomes: At the end of the activity the student should be able to:
LO5 Create structured and homologable themes of electronic music in any type of style and for any possible recipient of the audiovisual sector.
LO6 Understand the concepts of rhythm, harmony and melody.
LO7 Know computer music notation systems.
LO8 Create a topic with a suitable structure.

 

Activity 4. Editing and mixing.

Final editing, cleaning, mixing and mastering of the project.

Learning outcomes: At the end of the activity the student should be able to:
LO2 Use equalization and compression parameters.
LO4 Create their own sounds and sound textures for both music and special effects.
LO5 Create structured and homologable themes of electronic music in any type of style and for any possible recipient of the audiovisual sector.
LO6 Understand the concepts of rhythm, harmony and melody.
LO7 Know computer music notation systems.
LO8 Create a topic with a suitable structure.

 

Activity 5. Reading and class discussion of academic articles on audio production.

The theory of the subject is complemented by a series of academic articles on music production, some of which will be worked on collectively in class.

Learning outcomes: At the end of the activity the student should be able to:
LO14 Understand the different stages of a musical production and its tools and methodologies.
LO15 Identify the main aesthetic and stylistic currents in music in audiovisuals.
LO16 Have tools and analytical resources for an in-depth analysis of sound discourses in musical production, both historical and current.
LO17 Be able to analyze the role of sound in audiovisual media beyond strictly technical issues.

 

Activity 6. Music production project

Production of a piece of music (including planning, recording, editing and mixing) to choose from:

Free version
Own composition
Instrumental base for given voice track

The project can be considered from any of the tools worked on throughout the degree (DAW, sampling, audio recording ...) but must include at least one audio track and four samples from the sampling exercise (Practice 2). 

This work will be done in groups (the number of students per group must be agreed with the teacher).

Learning outcomes: At the end of the activity the student should be able to:

LO1. Use sound recording techniques in a wide range of situations.
LO2. Use equalization and compression parameters.
LO3. Make your own personal study based on DAW and / or Virtual study.
LO4. Create your own sounds and sound textures for both music and special effects.
LO5. Create structured and homologable themes of electronic music in any type of style and for any possible recipient of the audiovisual sector.
LO6. Understand the concepts of rhythm, harmony and melody.
LO7. Know computer music notation systems.
LO8. Create a theme with a proper structure.
LO9. Know the different parts of a musical arrangement.
LO10. Get to know the different musical styles and their characteristics.
LO11. Know how to plan a music recording.
LO12. Use sound recording techniques in a wide range of situations.
LO13. Creatively look for the sound elements needed for your goal and apply creativity.

 

Activity 7. Written report.

Each group must submit a written report of the project of the subject. It must be delivered through the eCampus in a format stipulated in the associated document. It will be advised that the structure of the report of the work be analogous to that of the TFG of the degree.

Learning outcomes: At the end of the activity the student should be able to:

LO14. Know the different stages of a music production and its tools and methodologies.
LO15. Identify the main aesthetic and stylistic currents of music in audiovisuals.
LO16. Have analytical tools and resources for an in-depth analysis of sound discourses in music production, both historical and current.
LO17. To be able to analyze the role of sound in the audiovisual media beyond strictly technical issues.

 

Activity 8. Follow-up tests.

2 tests of theoretical and practical content from online tests.

 

Activity 9. Final test

Final test of theoretical and practical knowledge.

 

In the event of confinement, the practical activities will be adapted in order to preserve the acquisition of all the procedural competencies set out in this teaching plan.

Evaluation system


The subject proposes the evaluation in four blocks: 

Activity 1. Follow-up tests (20%).

Activity 6. Music production project (15%).

Activity 7. Written report of the project (15%).

Activity 8. Final test (50%).

To take the average, you must have passed the final test with more than a 5 out of 10. Those students who obtain a grade lower than 5 will have to take a recovery test. The recovery test is passed with a 5. The remaining marks of the partial tests will be kept. In no case will it be possible to opt for recovery to raise a grade. Partial tests and the project have no recovery.

Grades may be reviewed at a date and place posted by the teacher through the eCampus.

REFERENCES


Basic

Cunningham, Mark. 1996. Good Vibrations. A history of record production. London: Sanctuary Productions.

Frith, Simon and Zagorski-Thomas, Simon, editors. 2012. The Art of Recording Production: An Introductory Reader for a New Academic Field. Surrey: Ashgate Publishing.

Moylan, William. 2002. The Art Of Recording: Understanding and Crafting the Mix. Burlington, Massachusetts: Focal Press.

Chanan, Michael. 1995. Repeated Takes: A Short History of Recording and Its Effects on Music. London: Verse.

Roquer, Jordi. 2018. Sound hyperreality in popular music: On the influence of audio production in our sound expectations. Cambridge Scholar Publishing.

Zagorski-Thomas, Simon. 2014. The Musicology of Record Production. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Daley, Dan. 2004. “The Engineers Who Changed Recording.” Sound on Sound Magazine, October. http://www.soundonsound.com/people/engineers-who-changed-recording

Doyle, Peter. 2005. Echo and Reverb: Fabricating Space in Popular Music Recording, 1900-1960. Middletown: Wesleyan University Press.

Katz, Mark. 2010. Capturing Sound: How Technology Has Changed Music. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Théberge, P. 1997. The Sound of Music. Inside Any Sound You Can Imagine: Making Music / Consuming Technology. New England: Wesleyan.

Simons, D. 2004. The Atlantic Story / From Funk to Punk. Inside Studio Stories. London: Backbeat Books

Levitin, DJ 2008. How recordings are made (I) in Audio anecdotes III: Tools, tips and techniques for digital audio (pp. 3-14). Natick: AK Peters 

Gibson, David. 1997. Styles of mix; Visual Representations. Inside The Art of Mixing. A Visual Guide to Recording. Michigan: MixBooks.

Cascone, Kim. The Aesthetics of Failure: "Post-Digital" Tendencies in Contemporary Computer Music. Computer Music Journal, Vol. 24, no. 4 (Winter, 2000), pp. 12-18

Sure, Silvia. 2019. Nostalgia ON: Sounds evocative of the Zeitgest of the eighties. Journal of Sound, Silence, Image and Technology, Núm. 2, Dec 2019.